South Downs Way

The South Downs Way is one of 15 National Trails in England and Wales and was the first bridleway National Trail in England. It is also the only National Trail to lie entirely within a National Park.

Stretching from the ancient cathedral city of Winchester in the west, first capital of England, through to the white chalky cliffs of the Seven Sisters and Beachy Head at Eastbourne in the east, almost all of its stunning Cyclist near Amberley on South Downs Way160 kilometre length is blissfully off-road. 

Walking, cycling or horse riding along the South Downs Way offers the opportunity to experience some of the finest landscapes in Britain. The Trail can be enjoyed as one long distance journey or as a series of separate excursions.

Following the entire 160 kilometre route, you can enjoy exceptional views of the Isle of Wight and the Solent, the high heathlands of the Western Weald and Blackdown, the heavily wooded Weald of Sussex, the receding ridges of the Chalk Downs themselves as well as the distant ridge of the North Downs. At the eastern end of the trail you can enjoy the famous sea cliffs of the Seven Sisters and Beachy Head.

The South Downs Way gives you the opportunity to see some of the finest historical sites including the great iron age hill forts of Old Winchester Hill, Chanctonbury Ring or Devils Dyke. There are numerous ancient burial sites and cross dykes as well as more recent sites such as Uppark House or WWII defensive sites.

For nature lovers, the South Downs Way passes through an extraordinary range of diverse habitats from ancient woodlands, river valleys, chalk grassland to mixed farm land and coastal habitats.

For further information on the South Downs Way, to plan a trip or request further information please visit the National Trail website - www.nationaltrail.co.uk/southdowns

Report a Problem

To report a problem along the South Downs Way in any Authority Area please contact the South Downs Way Team via email - sdw@southdowns.gov.uk or report it online.